High school principals connect with postsecondary ed representatives

High school principals have a lot on their minds this month as they work to support teachers and students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learning and sharing experiences with other principals is valuable while they navigate similar challenges, such as grading, attendance, and planning for graduation. The Chief Education Officer (CEO) Network – a partnership between the Association of Washington Principals (AWSP), Partnership for Learning, Washington Roundtable and Challenge Seattle – brings a cohort of Washington high school principals together this school year for monthly virtual workshops and offers access to online curriculum developed by AWSP.

The November CEO Network meeting offered an opportunity for principals connect with one another, as well as engage with representatives from postsecondary education groups and institutions around admissions, as well as resources for high school families and counselors.Read More

WA principals reconnect and share plans for fall

From supporting student engagement and staff mental health to deciding how to welcome freshmen and how many classes students should take, high school principals in Washington state face unique challenges this fall. As schools return remotely for many districts and racial equity discussions continue, principals have numerous responsibilities to their students and staff, making professional development opportunities especially valuable right now.

In mid-August, more than 20 Washington high school principals gathered to kick off the two-year Chief Education Officer (CEO) Network program, which provides professional and leadership development to a cohort of high school principals from across the state. The group reflected about the upcoming school year and the importance of racial equity. They also heard presentations about digital literacy and school reopening data.

A partnership between the Association of Washington Principals (AWSP), Partnership for Learning, Washington Roundtable and Challenge Seattle, the CEO Network will bring principals together this school year for monthly virtual workshops and offer access to online curriculum developed by AWSP.

“Our goal is to create a cohort of principals that can lean on each other and support each other,” said Scott Friedman, associate director for AWSP.Read More

New Report: Restarting Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

This spring brought the rapid escalation of the COVID-19 pandemic, unprecedented economic disruption, and a much-needed public conversation about racial equity. The Washington Roundtable and Partnership for Learning are committed to playing a collaborative and productive role as we move forward, together.

Today, we are releasing a new report underscoring that credential completion is increasingly essential, and that education can be a catapult for those farthest from opportunity and a driver of economic recovery.

This report shares lessons from the Great Recession; shines a light on those individuals who are most vulnerable in the economic wake of the COVID-19 pandemic (namely, people of color, young workers, and those with only a high school education); and begins to examine policy options and opportunities to build a better Washington. It highlights clear steps Washington schools and the state can take to ensure education quality and rigor during the pandemic, make up for pandemic-related setbacks, address inequities, and knock down barriers to credential attainment.

The challenges ahead are substantial, and the stakes are high. We remain wholly committed to our goal: By the high school class of 2030, 70% of Washington students complete a post-high school credential – such as a degree, apprenticeship, or certificate – by age 26. We all have a role to play in helping students get there.  Please join us on the #pathto70.

How HS principals and business leaders are coming together for WA students

The leadership demands of running a company and running a high school are more similar than one might expect. From personnel management and budgeting to healthy culture and handling crises, CEOs and high school principals share much in common.

This is one theme principals and business leaders have explored through the Chief Education Officer Network, a two-year program that provides professional and leadership development for a cohort of high school principals from across Washington state. A partnership between the Association of Washington School Principals (AWSP), Partnership for Learning, Washington Roundtable, and Challenge Seattle, the CEO Network brings principals together for a series of two-day workshops and offers access to online curriculum developed by AWSP. It also individually matches each of the principals with a senior executive from Washington’s private sector for one-on-one discussions and support.Read More

Practical support clears a path for kids to think big about their future

Laura Lyman, a 10th grader at Cascade High School in Leavenworth, plans to be the first in her family to attend college. She knows how to organize. She is motivated. She recognizes college education will have positive impacts on her future. The data says she’s right. Many of the job openings coming to our state will be filled by workers who have a credential after high school.

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“High School is Just the Beginning.” Q&A With Fanuel Abraha

Fanuel Abraha is a senior at Edmonds-Woodway High School. He also has big dreams and a clear plan to achieve those dreams. Fanuel was featured in our latest #CredentialEssential campaign video about the success of the Edmonds School District in enrolling students into education and training programs after high school.

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“College is an Opportunity”

The word “college” means different things to different people.

For some, college means a 4-year experience at a large university. For others, it means pursuit of an associate’s degree or a credential earned through community or technical college.

Whatever college means for you, one thing is true: completing a post-high school education or training program and earning a credential is essential, be it a degree, apprenticeship, or certificate. Students with a credential will earn nearly $1 million more in their lifetime. They will also open the door to the more than 700,000 job openings coming to Washington state by 2021.

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