How HS principals and business leaders are coming together for WA students

The leadership demands of running a company and running a high school are more similar than one might expect. From personnel management and budgeting to healthy culture and handling crises, CEOs and high school principals share much in common.

This is one theme principals and business leaders have explored through the Chief Education Officer Network, a two-year program that provides professional and leadership development for a cohort of high school principals from across Washington state. A partnership between the Association of Washington School Principals (AWSP), Partnership for Learning, Washington Roundtable, and Challenge Seattle, the CEO Network brings principals together for a series of two-day workshops and offers access to online curriculum developed by AWSP. It also individually matches each of the principals with a senior executive from Washington’s private sector for one-on-one discussions and support.Read More

Practical support clears a path for kids to think big about their future

Laura Lyman, a 10th grader at Cascade High School in Leavenworth, plans to be the first in her family to attend college. She knows how to organize. She is motivated. She recognizes college education will have positive impacts on her future. The data says she’s right. Our research projects more than 740,000 job openings in our state in coming years, and most will be filled by workers who have a credential after high school.

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“High School is Just the Beginning.” Q&A With Fanuel Abraha

Fanuel Abraha is a senior at Edmonds-Woodway High School. He also has big dreams and a clear plan to achieve those dreams. Fanuel was featured in our latest #CredentialEssential campaign video about the success of the Edmonds School District in enrolling students into education and training programs after high school.

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“College is an Opportunity”

The word “college” means different things to different people.

For some, college means a 4-year experience at a large university. For others, it means pursuit of an associate’s degree or a credential earned through community or technical college.

Whatever college means for you, one thing is true: completing a post-high school education or training program and earning a credential is essential, be it a degree, apprenticeship, or certificate. Students with a credential will earn nearly $1 million more in their lifetime. They will also open the door to the more than 700,000 job openings coming to Washington state by 2021.

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